GOING IN CIRCLES
O you who are going in circles,please stop.What are you doing it for?
“I cannot be without going,because I don’t know where to go.That’s why I go in circles.”
O you who are going in circles,please stop.
“But if I stop going,I will stop being.”
O my friend who is going in circles,you are not one withthis crazy business of going in circles.You may enjoy going,but not going in circles.
“Where can I go?”
Go where you can find your beloved,where you can find yourself.
Thich Nhat Hanh, Call Me by My True Names: The Collected Poems (Parallax Press; New edition edition, 1996) page 181

Cartoon | Speed Bump by Dave Coverly

GOING IN CIRCLES

O you who are going in circles,
please stop.
What are you doing it for?

“I cannot be without going,
because I don’t know where to go.
That’s why I go in circles.”

O you who are going in circles,
please stop.

“But if I stop going,
I will stop being.”

O my friend who is going in circles,
you are not one with
this crazy business of going in circles.
You may enjoy going,
but not going in circles.

“Where can I go?”

Go where you can find your beloved,
where you can find yourself.

Thich Nhat Hanh, Call Me by My True Names: The Collected Poems (Parallax Press; New edition edition, 1996) page 181

Cartoon | Speed Bump by Dave Coverly

LEARNING TO BE SILENT

The pupils of the Tendai school used to study meditation before Zen entered Japan. Four of them who were intimate friends promised one another to observe seven days of silence.

On the first day all were silent. Their meditation had begun auspiciously, but when night came and the oil lamps were growing dim one of the pupils could not help exclaiming to a servant: “Fix those lamps.”

The second…

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SAINT FRANCIS DANCING ON WATER
I love the fact that the artist, Monika Kaden, depicts Francis of Assisi with wings instead of arms, and dancing in a water-basin. Isn’t it true perhaps that dancing, and body gestures and movements give us wings?
Without ignoring for a moment the serious, painful, troubled and sometimes tragic aspects of life it is always worth remembering those wise words of G.K. Chesterton: "Angels can fly because they take themselves lightly."
Cathedral Church of St. Francis of AssisiSanta Fe, New Mexico
Art | St Francis dancing on water by Monika KadenQuotation |  G.K. Chesterton, Orthodoxy in Chapter VII, The Eternal Revolution

SAINT FRANCIS DANCING ON WATER

I love the fact that the artist, Monika Kaden, depicts Francis of Assisi with wings instead of arms, and dancing in a water-basin. Isn’t it true perhaps that dancing, and body gestures and movements give us wings?

Without ignoring for a moment the serious, painful, troubled and sometimes tragic aspects of life it is always worth remembering those wise words of G.K. Chesterton: "Angels can fly because they take themselves lightly."

Cathedral Church of St. Francis of Assisi
Santa Fe, New Mexico

Art | St Francis dancing on water by Monika Kaden
Quotation |  G.K. Chesterton, Orthodoxy in Chapter VII, The Eternal Revolution

THE OTHER SIDE

A drunk crossed the street and accosted a pedestrian, asking him, “I shay, which ish the other shide of the shtreet?”

The pedestrian, somewhat nonplussed, replied, “That side, of course!”

The drunk said, “Shtrange. When I wash on that shide, they shaid it wash thish shide.”

Source | Desmond Tutu, God is Not a Christian: And Other Provocation
(Harper One, 2011) page 5.

CONSIDER THIS

Where the…

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LAUGHING TOGETHER
"I have been confronted with many difficulties throughout the course of my life, and my country is going through a critical period. But I laugh often, and my laughter is contagious. When people ask me how I find the strength to laugh now, I reply that I am a professional laugher."  | The Dalai Lama
“Human beings are fundamentally good. The aberration, in fact, is the evil one, for God created us ultimately for God, for goodness, for laughter, for joy, for compassion, for caring.” |  Desmond Tutu

LAUGHING TOGETHER

"I have been confronted with many difficulties throughout the course of my life, and my country is going through a critical period. But I laugh often, and my laughter is contagious. When people ask me how I find the strength to laugh now, I reply that I am a professional laugher."  | The Dalai Lama

Human beings are fundamentally good. The aberration, in fact, is the evil one, for God created us ultimately for God, for goodness, for laughter, for joy, for compassion, for caring.” |  Desmond Tutu

JESUS CHRIST, LIBERATOR
What is now commonly referred to as “Laughing Jesus” or “Laughing Christ” was in fact titled "Jesus Christ, Liberator", by its originator, artist Willis Wheatley.  He was ahead of his time. He sketched the image in about 1973, when he was working for the United Church of Canada. It was one of four portraits Wheatley created of Jesus. The others showed his more serious sides.
FOR YOUR REFLECTION
“Jesus used humour and hyperbole to punch holes in pomposity … Part of Jesus’ charisma, was that he attended parties, drank wine, used irony and hung out with outcasts.” | Robert Funk
Image | Ralph Kozak, "Jesus Laughing," 1976 (based on the original black-and-white line drawing by Willis Wheatley, 1973).
The black and white photo is of Willis Wheatley, creator of the Laughing Jesus. Probably taken in 1983. UCC Archives, Toronto. 97.084P/14.
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JESUS CHRIST, LIBERATOR
What is now commonly referred to as “Laughing Jesus” or “Laughing Christ” was in fact titled "Jesus Christ, Liberator", by its originator, artist Willis Wheatley.  He was ahead of his time. He sketched the image in about 1973, when he was working for the United Church of Canada. It was one of four portraits Wheatley created of Jesus. The others showed his more serious sides.
FOR YOUR REFLECTION
“Jesus used humour and hyperbole to punch holes in pomposity … Part of Jesus’ charisma, was that he attended parties, drank wine, used irony and hung out with outcasts.” | Robert Funk
Image | Ralph Kozak, "Jesus Laughing," 1976 (based on the original black-and-white line drawing by Willis Wheatley, 1973).
The black and white photo is of Willis Wheatley, creator of the Laughing Jesus. Probably taken in 1983. UCC Archives, Toronto. 97.084P/14.
Zoom Info

JESUS CHRIST, LIBERATOR

What is now commonly referred to as “Laughing Jesus” or “Laughing Christ” was in fact titled "Jesus Christ, Liberator", by its originator, artist Willis Wheatley.  He was ahead of his time. He sketched the image in about 1973, when he was working for the United Church of Canada. It was one of four portraits Wheatley created of Jesus. The others showed his more serious sides.

FOR YOUR REFLECTION

“Jesus used humour and hyperbole to punch holes in pomposity … Part of Jesus’ charisma, was that he attended parties, drank wine, used irony and hung out with outcasts.” | Robert Funk

Image | Ralph Kozak, "Jesus Laughing," 1976 (based on the original black-and-white line drawing by Willis Wheatley, 1973).

The black and white photo is of Willis Wheatley, creator of the Laughing Jesus. Probably taken in 1983. UCC Archives, Toronto. 97.084P/14.

LAUGH UNTIL YOU LEAK

In A Christmas CarolCharles Dickens writes It is a fair, even-handed, noble adjustment of things, that while there is infection in disease and sorrow, there is nothing in the world so irresistibly contagious as laughter and good-humour. Laughter is contagious!

Listen to the short clip and surrender to it. Perhaps you will end up laughing! Remember what the other Charles (Charlie Chaplin): “A day without laughter is a day wasted.” 

Laugh, and laugh often. Laugh until you leak! That is when you know your are not in charge after all and you are not in control!

GIGGLE-O-METER | YOUR METER OF JOY
If we had to install a giggle-o-meter in our families, schools, and communities, a meter to measure the level of joy and laughter where would the meter register:
[1] high/healthy
[2] medium/ailing
[3] low/on life support
[4] dead?
If you find yourself closer to [4] than [1], what can you do to change the tide?

GIGGLE-O-METER | YOUR METER OF JOY

If we had to install a giggle-o-meter in our families, schools, and communities, a meter to measure the level of joy and laughter where would the meter register:

[1] high/healthy

[2] medium/ailing

[3] low/on life support

[4] dead?

If you find yourself closer to [4] than [1], what can you do to change the tide?

LAUGHTER EXERCISES
Who needs a silly Adam Sandler movie? Here are five family-friendly laughter exercises suggested by laughter-yoga leader and elementary-school teacher Suzanne Martin. The concept involves using dramatic scenarios as a group to turn fake laughter into genuine giggles. Maintain eye contact and pause to breathe deeply between each exercise. (Note: If you feel foolish, it’s a good sign you are doing it properly.) “Once you catch on,” promises Martin, “you can bring a laughter philosophy into anything in life.”
The cellphone laugh
Pretend you are talking on a cellphone, and the person on the end is saying something that makes you crack up. Make eye contact with the rest of the group as you walk around the room.
The bow-and-arrow laugh
Hold an imaginary bow and pull back the arrow, breathing in deeply. When you release the arrow, you let out a huge laugh. (Also known as the explosive laugh.)
The gradient laugh
Begin with a quiet chuckle. Advance to a medium-sized guffaw. End with the loudest belly laugh you can muster.
The Charlie Chaplin laugh
The opposite of above. Your face is scrunched up, your arms wrapped around your stomach, you are bent over with gales of laughter, but silent.
The roller-coaster laugh
Line up chairs one behind the other, and each person takes a seat, pretending they are sitting on a roller coaster. Start with quiet laughter on the bumpy ride up the first hill, and then, as the ride swoops down, raise your arms above your head, laughing as exuberantly as you can.
Source | Globe and Mail

LAUGHTER EXERCISES

Who needs a silly Adam Sandler movie? Here are five family-friendly laughter exercises suggested by laughter-yoga leader and elementary-school teacher Suzanne Martin. The concept involves using dramatic scenarios as a group to turn fake laughter into genuine giggles. Maintain eye contact and pause to breathe deeply between each exercise. (Note: If you feel foolish, it’s a good sign you are doing it properly.) “Once you catch on,” promises Martin, “you can bring a laughter philosophy into anything in life.”

The cellphone laugh

Pretend you are talking on a cellphone, and the person on the end is saying something that makes you crack up. Make eye contact with the rest of the group as you walk around the room.

The bow-and-arrow laugh

Hold an imaginary bow and pull back the arrow, breathing in deeply. When you release the arrow, you let out a huge laugh. (Also known as the explosive laugh.)

The gradient laugh

Begin with a quiet chuckle. Advance to a medium-sized guffaw. End with the loudest belly laugh you can muster.

The Charlie Chaplin laugh

The opposite of above. Your face is scrunched up, your arms wrapped around your stomach, you are bent over with gales of laughter, but silent.

The roller-coaster laugh

Line up chairs one behind the other, and each person takes a seat, pretending they are sitting on a roller coaster. Start with quiet laughter on the bumpy ride up the first hill, and then, as the ride swoops down, raise your arms above your head, laughing as exuberantly as you can.

Source | Globe and Mail

THE FOUNTAIN

And here is a piece of music for your weekend. Surrender to its flow and allow your thirst to be quenched by the streaming waters of grace.

Lyrics

Dolorosa, flumenosa, desolata, lacrimabila Dolorosa, flumenosa, plorata

The water sighs for me through teardrops now I see
The streaming water knows the fountain overflows
To cry for all, to wash all sorrow in waves of peace and love
Free my thirsty soul again
O living fountain

Lyrics Source | Peace – Deluxe Edition | Libera Official Website